Back to sailplane index


US Agent: Grob Systems, Inc., 1070 Navajo Drive, Bluffton, OH 45817 Tel (419)358-9015, Fax (419) 358-3660


Grob G 102 Astir CS, CS-77, Standard II and Standard III

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Astir CS (club standard) was the first sailplane designed and serially produced by Grob. It features composite (fiberglass/resin) construction, a large wing area, a T-tail and water ballast. A Standard Class Sailplane, the large wing area gives good low speed handling characteristics. The main gear retracts. A slightly improved version, the CS-77, was introduced in 1977. The CS-77 has a different rudder profile fuselage similar to that of the Speed Astir. The Standard III followed in the early 1980’s reverting to the higher profile fuselage and with reduced empty weight and increased payload. One, flown by R.R. Harris of the U.S., won the world absolute altitude record at 14.938 m./ 49.009 ft in 1986. Specifications are given for the Standard III. ATC, except for the Standard II which is EXP.


Grob G 102 Astir CS Jeans, Club III and Club IIIB

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Astir CS Jeans was of similar configuration to the CS 77, but with fixed wheel located ahead of the center of gravity, and a tailskid. This was followed by the Club II with similar fixed gear. The Club III has a fixed main gear ahead of the center of gravity, and a tailwheel. The Club IIIB has a cockpit almost identical to the front seat of the two-place G 103 Twin II with a fixed main gear aft of the center of gravity and a nosewheel. ATC(except Club II which is EXP)


Grob G 103 Twin Astir

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Twin Astir was a two-seat development of the Standard Class Astir CS. The gear retracts by folding up to the left and lying horizontally under the rear seat. A 3.3 degrees forward sweep of the wing was replaced early in the production run by a straight wing with leading edges at right angles to the fuselage centerline. In contrast to later G 103 models, the Twin Astir has the main wheel ahead of the center of gravity, and does not have a nose wheel. It was offered with a tailskid, with a tail wheel as an option. The G 103T Twin Aster had a fixed main wheel.


Grob G 103A TwinII and Twin II Acro (RAF Viking T. MK1)

Specifications

Performance

Other

The G-1o3 A Twin II was the successor of the Twin Astir with a fixed six-inch main gear fitted behind the center of gravity in a fairing and a nose wheel. The main wheel is equipped with a hydraulic brake. Modified ailerons produce a substantially improved roll response. Approach control is by top surface Schemmpp-Hith type airbrakes. The Twin II won the world Out & Return record for two-seat sailplanes (1000.88 km/ 621.92 miles) flown by Tom Knauff of the U.S. The Twin II Acro is similar to the earlier model, but with strengthened mainspar caps and steel control pushrod which permit greater aerobatic performance. The Royal Air Force acquired 100 Acros (known as the Viking T. MK.1) for its air cader training program. The G 103 has a FAA approved modification kit for all-hand control for handicapped operation. ATC.


Grob G 103C Twin III Acro and Twin IIISL

Specifications – Twin III (Twin IIISL in parenthesis)

Performance

Other

The G 103 C Twin III is a development of the Twin II with a new ‘Discus’ plan wing of slightly increased span and modified airfoil section. The cockpit has detailed improvements including better ventilation, relocated airbrake levers to give better purchase, and canopies restrained by gas-filled struts. The unpowered sailplane is cleared for aerobatics similar to the Twin II Acro. The self-launching version (Twin III SL), which is non-aerobatic, has an electrically actuated mast-mounted retracting engine and steerable nose wheel, Fuel is stored in a main tank in the fuselage close to the engine, and in an auxiliary tank in the left wing root from which fuel is moved by a transfer pump. The variable pitch propeller has climb and cruise setting. ATC.


Grob G 104 Speed Astir II and IIB

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Speed Astir II was developed from the earlier Standard Class Astir family as Burkhart Grob’s first entry into the 15 m. racing class. It features elastic hinge fairings for flaps and ailerons, which are mounted on a wing of significantly smaller area than that of the earlier Astir models. The hinge points are below the wing, so that positive deflections result in small increases in effective area. The IIB has a slightly longer cockpit to accommodate taller pilots.


 

Grob G 109 and G 109B ( RAF Vigilant T. MK.1)

Specifications – G 109 (G 109B in parenthesis)

Performance

Other

The self-launching side-by-side G 109 cruises under power better than 124 mph and has a cruising range in excess of 500 miles. Approach control is by airbrakes. A G-109 has held the world motorglider record for absolute alitude (6,406 m. /21,018 ft.) and Altitude Gain ( 5,042 m. / 16,544 ft.). The Grob G 109 B, which first flew in 1983, is an improved, enlarged and more powerful development with a Grob engine and redesigned canopy. The Royal Air Force purchased 54 G 109B’s (kwown as the Vigilant T. MK.1) for its air cader training program. ATC


If you have any comments or additional info or picture e-mail me

Back to sailplane index