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SCHEMPP-HIRTH FLUGZEUGBAU GmbH
Krebenstrasse 25, D-73230 Kirchheim/Teck, Germany
Tel +49 (0)7021 2441 Fax +49 (0)7021 483809

Dutch Agent: Hans Disma, fax +31 (0)30 691 5222

US Agent: Knauff and Grove


Schempp-Hirth Wolf (Goppingen 1)

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Wolf was named after Wolf Hirth, partner with Martin Schempp in the then new firm of Sportflugzeugbau Goppingen (now Schempp-Hirth). It was produced in 1935 as a rival to the Schneider Grunau Baby as a utility (rather than a high performance) sailplane. It lacks any approach control devices but has a built-in-wheel, an unusual feature for the time. It was used widely for aerobatic displays, for which it could be fitted with an extra strut (making a V-strut) to permit inverted maneuvers. It had poor spinning characteristics, and in 1938 all those flying in Germany were grounded until modifications were incorporated in the wingtip and ailerons. One example belongs to the National Soaring Museum. The Vintage Sailplane Association has plans available.


Schempp-Hirth Minimoa (Goppingen 3)

Specifications

Performance

Other

First flown in 1935, the Minimoa established a number of records, including the world altitude record in 1938 (using lift in cumulo nimbus cloud) of 6,687 m./ 21,939 ft. The name was an abbreviation of its original nickname, Mini-Moazagotl, as it was a smaller successor of Hirth’s earlier 20 m. Moazagotl. Distinctive in many respects, the Minimoa was stable, but with poor roll control by later standards. It was the first sailplane to carry water ballast, in a tank behind the cockpit. Richard du Pont and Chet Decker flew Minimoas to win the U.S. Championships in 1937 and 1939. One belongs to the National Soaring Museum. The Vintage Sailplane Association has plans. ATC


Go-4 III

Specifications

Performance

Other


Schempp-Hirth Cirrus

Specifications

Performance

Other

The original all-fiberglass Open Class Cirrus made its debut in 1967 and won the World Open Class Chapionship at Leszno in Poland in 1968. The prototype had a V-tail, but production versions had a conventional tail with horizontal tail with horizontal stabilizer set part way up the fin. Airbrakes on top and bottom wing surfaces provide glidepath control; there are no flaps, and the landing gear is retractable. German production ceased in 1971, but manufacture (Cirrus-VTC) was transferred to Jastreb Fabrika Aviona Jedrilica in Serbia, Yugoslavia.

 


Schempp-Hirth Discus
 

Specifications – Discus A, B, bT, BM, CS (WL) click on photo for larger picture

Performance

Other

The Standard Class Discus A first flew in 1984 using the fuselage and tail unit of the original Ventus with a new unflapped wing. The wing planform is noteworthy as being the first production sailplane to have the now common distictive shape where the leading edge sweepback increases towards the tip, establishing a worldwide trend in wing planforms. Approach control is by top surface double panel schempp-hirth airbrakes. There is a 5kg. / 11 lb. Water ballast tank in the fin for trimming purposes when the main wing mounted ballast tanks are used. The Discus B incorporates the longer fuselage (about 23 cm/ 9 in) and roomier cockpit of the Ventus B.
The sustainer engined Discus bT, which first flew in 1988, has a retractable mast mounted15kW/ 21 bhp Solo engine with a Oehler folding prop.
The self-launching Discus bM has a Rotax engine in the fusealage with a retractable mast mounted prop.
The Discus won the first three places in the Standard Class at the 1985 World Championships at Rieti, Italy, 12 out of the first 15 at the 1987 Worlds at Benalla, Austria, and again the first three places at the 1989 Worlds at Wiener Neustadt, Austria. Up to 1995 the Discus won all first places in the world championships.
The Discus CS is built under license in the Czech Republic by Orlican. Specifications are for the Discus A.
The winglets (WL) is an option that was developed in later stadium for further improvement of the climb performance.



Schempp-Hirth Discus-2

Specifications – Discus 2B

Performance

Other

Discus 2 - first impressions by Andreas Maurer ( article in rec.aviation.soaring)

First, let me point out that it was the first prototype of a new airplane. Therefore anyone will see that nothing I'm going to say will be cemented for all times.

A quick glance on Discus 2, registrated D-6111 "D2" shows a strong similarity to the Ventus 2. Wing geometry seems similar (of course), but now the wings have a more progressive dihedrahl, the (removeable) wingtips canted upwards an amazing 30 degrees. Tilo Holighaus says that this has got the effect of winglets (based on latest studies of this topic by Richard Eppler). The airfoil is thin (about 14.5 percent), incorporating studies by K.H. Horstmann and Dr. Wuerz (wing) and Luc Boermans (tail).

The 5" wheel with a hydraulic brake keeps the fuselage far away from the ground. Compared to an LS-8 about twice the way (!).

The tail looks identical to the one of the familiar Ventus 2 as well does the cockpit, but in fact both are completely new designs (the cockpit similar to the one of the Nimbus 4). The latter is made for huge pilots: I measure 6'7" and fit perfectly into it, with a thick parachute and a coat. It is one of the biggest currently available cockipts. All the levers are in the right place - with one word: Successful. The first Schempp Hirth cockpit I really fit into. Empty weight of the prototype is about 240 kg, and ramp weight of me about 100 kg, therefore we filled three liters of water into the tail tank, so the total weight during the flight was about 350 kg.

Once seated in the cockpit the high fuselage incidence on the ground is noticeable - the instrument panel might make it a little difficult to look over it for small pilots whose head is not close to the canopy.

There were no thermals the time I was flying, and it had rained slightly before I made the aerotow, therefore I took off with wet wings. The controls were very responsive and light, but I had to fight a little to stay behinfd the towplane since there was a strong, gusty wind from the left (10 - 15 kts) and the air was turbulent close to the ground. The Dicus 2 seems to need a long ground roll (as well as the Duo), and, once airborne, it had an amazing fuselage incidence. Tow speed was between 120 and 130 km/h, and the towplane, a Morane 180, was just over the panel. Keeping the towplane on the horizon made its fuselage vanish behind the panel, therefore I stayed a little bit lower than usual. I felt that this behaviour was not annoying nor difficult, but interesting: It seems that the Dicus 2 will be good on high speeds. It was very easy to keep the position behind the towplane, and the Dicus 2 flew very stable.

After release at 2200 ft GND I tried a few stalls in clean configuration (flaps and gear not extended) first as long as the wings were wet (we crossed some showers during the tow). The gear handle only needed little power but I needed three tries to lock it since I didn't get my long lower arm as much backwards a necessary ( a problem
I have on most gliders).

First buffetings on the airspeed indicator began at about 77 km/h IAS (vortices of the upper fuselage hitting the airspeed probe that was mounted on the vertical tail), followed by a slight vibration at about 73 km/h IAS. The stall ocurred at less than 70 km/h IAS, the airplane vibrating and the airspeed indicator trembling between 65 and 80 km/h. The Discus 2 took down the nose without the slightest tendency to turn over a wing (probably caused by the high dihedral of the wing). With halfways dry wings the same behaviour ocurred at slightly lower airspeeds. With one word: Safe. I didn't try a spin since I didn't know whether the airplane had been cleared for spins yet.

A few circles in slightly reduced sink at 90 km/h showed a high fuselage incidence again - I wonder how it will feel at the maximum flight mass of 525 kg. I had the feeling that the wing needs very few corrections yet shows a direct reaction to airmass movements. Of course one can't say anything when he didn't fly it in a real thermal, but I had a good impression. The stick forces are very light, aileron as well as elevator very effective (about 2.5 secs for a 30/30 degrees turn change). The rudder is very effective  it was even unnecessary to use full rudder when I applied full aileron to keep the turn coordinated (I wasn't able to deflect the stick to the limit since my legs stopped it about 3 centimeeters from ist maximum deflection to the right and left). A coordinated turn is very easy to fly since the adverse yaw is very low, but the first two tries to establish a stable sideslip were unsuccessful because the Discus 2 kept turning into the direction of the deflected rudder with wings nearly horizontal. A sideslip with about two third extended rudder and fully extended aileron was successful (and effective) for a few seconds before it recovered by itself. I couldn't give it another try due to insufficient altitude, but I think that with a little experience the sideslip will be easy to execute.

The elevator trim is the typical Schempp Hirth construction, a gear segment on the left side of the cockpit, basically the same construction as on the twenty five year old Janus. It needed too much force for my taste (Tilo agreed on that, so I guess this will be history soon), but on the other hand it works precisely. By the way, you don't have to trim the Discus 2 much - even at 220 km/h I didn't notice unpleasant stick forces with the airplane still trimmed for 100 km/h. It accelerates quickly with the fuselage nearly neutral (guess why) and reminded me of a flapped ship. It also regained about 330 ft again from 220 km/h.

The ventilation of the cockipt is great, with the (once again, Janus-age old) ventilation flap in the front of the canopy and a second adjustable one on the right side of the cockpit. Both take their air from the opening of the front towhook in the nose. In my opinion the front ventilation flap either makes noise when closed or blows strong when opened. I would rather like a construction more that could be closed, silent and tight (without needing to be modified with a coat or something similar).

The approach was executed a little bit hot with 110 km/h since I expected some gusts on final. The double-slotted airbrakes are powerful, yet again the nose was rather high. Touchdown was easy, the hydraulic brake worked well and the tail stayed on the ground while braking moderately. It was easy to keep the wings level but I couldn't hold them until the plane came to rest. Once level, the wingtips are very high above the ground, but if a wing is lying on the ground with deflected aileron, the aileron touches the ground and is in danger of being damaged by the smallest stone. In my opinion this demands a higher protection and Tilo agreed
- according to him a solution will be applied soon.

The tail wheel makes the ground handling easy, even without tail dolly. The dis-assembling was easy, too.

To describe the filght characteristics it in one sentence: It's characteristics are nearly identical with its big brother, the Duo, but the responses are more direct (of course: lighter airframe) and the airbrakes are stronger.

Conclusion:
The Discus 2 will make its way. The first prototype I flew is so close to series standard that I wouldn't have noticed it if I hadn't known this. The only points I really noticed as a little bit extraordinary (not disturbing) was the long take off roll, the high nose at low speeds and the not-perfect elevator trim.

Performances are not known yet.
 


Schempp-Hirth Duo Discus

Specifications

Performance

The Duo Discus was conceived as an advanced trainer with good cross country ability. It has a four piece unflapped wing with a modified ‘Discus’ planform. The fuselage is derived from that of the two-place Janus. Approach control is by top surface airbrakes. ATC


Schempp-Hirth Janus (RAF Janus T. Mk. 1)

Specifications – Janus C

Performance

Other

First flying in 1974, the Janus seats two in tandem with the rear seat occupant positioned near the center of gravity. The original Janus and Janus B models had an 18.2 m. wingspan, fixed landing gear and a gross weight of 621 kg. / 1,370 lb. The Janus C incorporated carbon fiber components, retractable gear, a wingspan of 20 m. and a gross weight of 700 kg./ 1,543 lb. Camber-changing flaps (+12 to –7 degree), top surface-only airbrakes and a tail drag chute provide options for approach control. In all versions a small fixed wheel between the main gear ant the nose allows strong braking without scraping the nose. Motorized versions are the Janus CM self-launcher with retractable mast mounted Rotax two cycle engine, and the sustainer Janus CT with a 15 kW/ 21 bhp Oehler Solo 2350 turbo engine. The Royal Air Force acquired 2 Janus C’s for its air cadet program. Janus B model is shown. Specifications are for the Janus C. ATC


Schempp-Hirth Mini-Nimbus

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Mini-Nimbus, which first flew in 1976, is a 15-meter racing class development of the Open Class Nimbus 2 with a new wing with both dive brakes and flaps, which may be operated seperately or together to provide unusually effective glidepath and landing control. Water ballast is carried in sealed tanks lying along the spar. All controls connect automatically as the flying surfaces are installed, and the trim lever needs to be set only once per flight; thereafter changes in flap setting (-7 to +10 degree) automatically cause trim compensation. The original version has an all-moving horizontal tail, but the C model is made with a fixed horizontal stabilezer, optional carbon fiber wings and tail (which reduce the empty weight by 20 kg. /44 lb.) and a modified trim system. ATC


Schempp-Hirth Nimbus 2

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Nimbus 2 (developed from the 1969 22 m. Nimbus which George Moffat won the Open Class World Championships at Marfa, Texas in 1970) first flew in 1971. The four piece wing has flaps interconnected with the ailerons with settings which range from +6 to –8 degrees, with 20 degrees for landing. Later –2B and –2C developments carry more ballast with higher gross weight. The –2C replaced the all moving tailplane woth a conventional fixed horizontal and moving elevater. Three New Zealand pilots, B.L. Drake, Don Speight and S.H. Georgeson, jointly won the World goal/ distance record of 1,254 km./ 779 miles in 1978 flying Nimbus 2 ‘s. Women pilots have also gained the following records flying Nimbus 2’s : Doris Grove of the U.S., goal/ return distance of 1,127 km. /700.2 miles in 1981, Y. Loader of New Zealand, height gain of 10,212 m. /33.504 ft. in 1988, and Joan shaw of the U.S., goal/ distance of 951.43 km. / 591.2 miles in 1990. The specifications are for the –2C. ATC


Schempp-Hirth Nimbus 3

Specifications

Performance

Other

Schempp-Hirth’s replacement for the Nimbus 2 was the Nimbus 3. The original version, which first flew in 1981, has a 22.9 m. wing, which may be increased to 24.5 m. with tip extensions. The wing is in four pieces plus the tip extensions, and is equipped with flaps interconnected with upper surface trailing edge airbrakes. Approach control is assisted by top surface double segment airbrakes. The 24.5 m. tips have spoiler flaps incorporated at the trailing edge. When rolling at large aileron deflection, the spoiler flap deploys to compensate for lack of rudder to permit coordinated flight. The Nimbus 3 won the first 6 places in the Open Class at the 1983 World Soaring Championships at Hobbs, NM, as well as taking 9 of the next 12 places. It also won the first 8 places in the Open Class at the 1985 Worlds at Rieti, Italy. Flight testing by Dick Johnson measured the L/D max. of the 22.9 version (which has an increased gross weigt 750 kg. /1,654 lb.) to be substantially less – about 50 : 1. Tom Knauff of the U.S. won the world goal/ out and return distance record of 1,647 km. / 1,023.4 miles in a Nimbus 3 in 1983. He also won, jointly, the world triangle record at 1,363 km. / 846.9 miles in a Nimbus 3 in 1986. A world record for 100 km and 300 km speed triangles were also made by pilots flying Nimbus 3’s. The sustainer version (Nimbus 3t) has a 15 kW/ 21 bhp Oehler Solo 2350 turbo engine. Specifications are for the Nimbus 3/ 24.5


Schempp-Hirth Nimbus 3D

Specifications – Nimbus 3D (3DM in parenthesis)

Performance

Other

The Nimbus 3D, which first flew in 1986, combined a modified Janus C fuselage with 24.5 Nimbus 3 wings. In addition to the unpowered sailplane, it was produced with as a sustainer (3DT) with a 19 kW/ 26 bhp Oehler Solo 2350 engine and a self-launcher (3DM) with a retractable mast mounted Rotax engine. Specifications in parenthesis relate to the 3DM model. A Nimbus 3D took third place in the Open Class of the 1989 World Championships at Wiener Neustadt, Austria. A Nimbus 3DM flown by Theo Newfield and Michael Oakley of New Zealand won the world two seat motorglider out and return record of 841.17 km./ 522.7 miles in 1995.


Schempp-Hirth Nimbus 4

Specifications

Performance

Other

The increased span replacement of the single place Open Class Nimbus 3 first flew in 1990. The six piece wing has a multi-stage Discus style leading edge sweepback. When the double panel top surface airbrakes are opened, the flaps lower automatically to the landing position (approximately 40 degrees). There is a fin mounted trim ballast tank. It comes un unpowered and sustainer versions, the latter powered 19 kW/ 26 bhp Oehler Solo 2350 turbo engine and with a max. gross of 750 kg./ 1,764 lb. Nimbus 4’s took 3rd, 4th and 5th places in the Open Class in the 1991 World Championships at Uvalde, TX


Schempp-Hirth Nimbus 4D

Specifications – Nimbus 4D (4DM inparenthesis)

Performance

Other

The Nimbus 4D is the successor to the earlier 24.6 m. Nimbus 3D. The six piece Discus planform wing has full span camber changing flaperons. Approach control is by double segment top surface Schempp-Hirth airbrakes which are interconnected with the inboard sections of the flaps. There is an optional fin ballast tank for trimming purposes. The sustainer model (4DT) has a 20 kW/ 26 bhp Oehler Solo 2350 Turbo engine which is started by windmilling the propeller. The blades fold up automatically when the engine stops. The self-launching Nimbus 4DM has the engine buried in the fuselage with only the radiator, propeller and its drive system on the electrically actuated retractable mast which is raised into the airflow. Apart from drag reduction, this substantially reduces the noise footprint. Specifications for the 4DM are in parenthesis.


Schempp-Hirth SHK

Specifications

Performance

Other

The SHK 17 m. Open Class sailplane was developed in 1965 from the 15 m. Standard Austria/ SH-1, with V-tail surfaces 50 % larger and other improvements. It has a mass balanced all moving tailplane with aerodynamic trim tabs. An SHK finished in 3rd place in the Open Class of the 1965 World Championships at South Cerney in England. In 1967 an improved model was introduced (most of the emphasis being directed toward increasing cockpit comfort) and a tail chute was made available. The SHK may have been the ultimate development of the conventional wooden sailplane before composite ships became widely available. One example belongs to the National Soaring Museum. ATC


 Schempp-Hirth Standard Austria

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Standard Austria was developed in 1959 by the Austrian Aero Club and won the 1960 OSTIV prize for the best Standard Class design entered in the World Championships at Koln-Butzwelerhof in Germany. 14 were built in Austria before production was licensed and transferred to Schempp-Hirth in Germany. Schempp-Hirth produced 30 Austrias and 5 improved and slightly heavier Austria SH’s. All these Austrias had an NACA 65(2)-415 airfoil. Standard Austrias held the world goal recor of 737 km./ 458 miles and the world goal-and-return record of 698 km./ 434 miles. In 1964 a modified version appeared with an Eppler 266 airfoil to improve low-speed performance. A retractable gear was optional (making it a SH-I), giving much improved ground clearance. The Standard Austria has an all-moving V-tail and airbrakes. ATC


Schempp-Hirth Standard Cirrus

Specifications

Performance

Other

Although the Standard Cirrus was a follow-on to the original Open Class Cirrus design, it is completely different aircraft, with a 15 m. wing with airbrakes on the top surface only, an all-moving T-tail and a steel tube skeleton in the wing-fuselage center section. A Cirrus won the U.S. Standard Class Nationals in 1969. Despite a claimed L/D ratio of 38.5, measured performance by both Paul Bikle and Ricard H. Johnson demonstrated less than 36. In 1975 an improved version called the Cirrus 75 was introduced with redesigned wing fairings, larger airbrakes and other improvements. 200 were manufactured under license by Grob in Germany. After production in Germany ceased, the Standard Cirrus was manufactured in Serbia, Yugoslavia by Jastreb Fabrika Aviona Jedrilica (formerly VTC), first the Cirrus 75 version, and subsequently a modified Cirrus 81 with roomier cockpit and variable incidence tailplane. ATC


Schempp-Hirth Ventus

Specifications

Performance

Other

The 15-meter Ventus (not to be confused with the later completely redesigned Ventus 2) has all-carbon fiber wings. The strength of this material permitted use of a very thin airfoil developed by F.X. Wortmann, Dieter Althaus and Ventus designer Klaus Holighaus. The stiffness of carbon fiber prevents wing twist at high speeds such as often occurs with fiberglass. The Ventus first flew in 1980 and was offered with an A model for shorter pilots, and a slightly wider and longer B model for pilots up to 196 cm/ 6 feet/ 5 inches in height. The Ventus has trailing-edge combination flaps and dive brakes, and aileron control mixers which reduce aileron deflection when extreme positve or negative flap is selected. The B model had optional 16.6 m. tip extensions, while the C model offered 15 m. winglets tip extensions increasing the span to 16.6 or 17.6 m., and a 5 kg. /11 lb. Fin ballast tank. Dick Johnson tested a modified Ventus A with 16.5 m. tip extensions to give a demonstrated best L/D of 50 at 78 kph/ 42 kt/ 48 mph and a minimum sink rate of 0.43 m/s/ 1.42 fps/ 0.84 kt. The sustainer Ventus bT had 16.6 m. wings and a retractable 15 kW/ 20 bhp Oehler Solo turbo engine. The cT had 17.6 m. wings and a Solo engine uprated to 22 kW/ 30 bhp. A Ventus won the 15 m. class at the 1983 World Championships at Hobbs, NM, and others took 10 of the first 15 places. R.L. Robertson of Great Britain, along with others, won the world triangle distance record of 1,363 km./ 846.9 miles in 1986 in a Ventus A. Specifications are for the Ventus A.


Schempp-Hirth Ventus 2

Specifications – Ventus 2b (2C in parenthesis)

Performance

Other

The Ventus 2, despite its names, is substantially changed from its similarly named predecessor. It has a complely new Discus planform wing and comes in a number of different configurations. The unpowered sailplane comes in three different varieties, the short fuselage 15 m. Ventus 2a, the larger fuselage 15 m. –2b, and the convertible tip 2c (which has the larger –2b fuselage) with a choice of 15 m. or 18 m. outer wing panels. The sustainer engined 2cT comes with 18 m. span, while the self-launching 2cM has the 15 m. or 18 m. wingtip option with an empty weight of approximately 350 kg./ 772 lb. The liquid cooled Solo engine remains in the fuselage when the mast mounted propeller is raised. This has folding blades which reduce the size of the cutout required in the fuselage to accommodate the mast. As a flapped sailplane, the 15 m. versions comply with 15 m. racing class at the 1995 World Championships at Omarama, New Zealand. Specifications are for the 15 m. Ventus 2b, with those for the unpowered 18 m. 2c in parenthesis.


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