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Alexander Schleicher
Huhrain 1, Postfach 60, 36161 Poppenhausen, Germany
Tel +49 (0)6658 890     Fax +49 (0)6658 8940

US Agent: Eastern Sailplane, P.O. Box 753 Waynesville OH 45068 Fax 513-897-5909 email murraylx@erinet.com


Schleicher Condor 4

Specifications

Performance Other A postwar development of the pre-World War II single-seat Condor seriesm the two-seat Condor 4 first flew in 1953. It has balanced DFS upper and lower surface airbrakes for approach control and a skid with jettisonable dolly for takeoff.

 


Schleicher Rhohbussard

Specifications

Performance Other The Rhonbussard, which first flew in 1933, was an intermediate performance sailplane, coming in performance between the Grunau Baby and the high performance ships of the time, It lacks any spoilers, airbrakes or flaps for approach control. It has a skid landing gear, with jettisonable dolly for takeoff. One feature, which led to some notoriety, was the requirement for the wings to be joined together at the roots before being presented to the fuselage for attachment.

 


Schleicher Ka-1

Specifications

Performance Other The prototype Ka-1, which first flew in 1952, was constructed in Kaiser’s attic. The model was later produced by Schleicher. The Ka-1 has top surface spoilers for approach control. No landing wheel is fitted, takeoff normally being made with the glider sitting on its mainskid.


Schleicher Ka-2 Rhonschwalbe

Specifications – Ka-2 (Ka-2b in parenthesis

Performance Other The Ka-2 was designed as a two-place advanced trainer. The later Ka-2B had the wingspan inceased to 16 m. Approach control is effected by top and bottom surface Schempp-Hirth type airbrake. Specifications in parenthesis are for the Ka-2B. ATC.

 


Schleicher Ka-3

Specifications

 Performance Other The Ka-3, which first flew in 1956, was a development of the earlier Ka-1 with a steel fuselage instead of wood. The Ka-3 has top surface spoilers for approach control and main skid, but no wheel. Schleicher also offered the Ka-3 in kit form.

 


Schleicher Ka-4 Rhonlerche

Specifications

Performance Other The Rhonlerche is a small, strut-braced, 2-seat trainer similar to the Scheibe Specht, which first flew in 1955. It features a steel-tube, fabric-covered fuselage, a wooden fabric-covered wing with top-surface spoilers, a fixed wheel and nose skid, and tandem seating. ATC

 


Schleicher Ka-6CR

Specifications

 Performance Other The series began with the 14 m. Ka 6. This was followed by the Standard Class (15 m.) Ka-6b, with skid, and Ka6Br with main wheel. The Ka-6B won the OSTIV prize for the best Standard Class design at the 1958 World Championships at Leszno, Poland. The –6c version was a –6b with modified wing root. It has more of the wing covered with plywood and incorporates other minor improvements, and also comes in skid and wheeled (-6cr) models. All models have airbrakes for approach control. Some later –6CR models are designated as Ka-6CRPE’s, the PE standing for pendulum elevators (the all-moving tail used on the Ka-6E). Heinz Huth of Germany won in the Standard Class at the 1960 Koln-Butzwelerhof, Germany and 1963 Junin, Argentina World Championships in Ka-6’s. In 1963 two Ka-6’s were flown 876.0 km./ 544.3 miles by Karl Betzler and Otto Schauble from Germany to France, setting a world distance record, and in 1964, Wally Scott of the U.S. flew his Ka-6CR to a world goal of 837.7 km./ 520.55 miles. ATC

 


Schleicher Ka-6E

Specifications

Performance Other The Ka-6E was produced concurrently with the Ka-6CR for three years. The Ka-6E has, compared to the earlier –6CR, a longer canopy a lower fuselage (cross section reduced 10%), a modified leading edge prodile and an all-moving tail. Hans Werner Grosse of Germany, flying a Ka-6E as a guest, was the highest scoring pilot at the 1965 U.S. Nationals. Wally Scott won the 1967 Barringer Trophy by flying 888 km./ 552 miles in a Ka-6E. One belongs to the National Soaring Museum. ATC


Schleicher Ka-7

Specifications

Performance Other The Ka-7 is a two-place tandem trainer which has very effective dive brakes. It onve held the multi-place world record for speed around a 500 km. Triangle at 84 kph/ 45 kt/ 52 mph, set in South Africa in 1964. It succeeded the earlier Ka-2 model, differing mainly by the introduction of a steel tube, fabric covered fuselage in place of wood/ fabric. A modified plan exists to lower the wings to the mid position and fit a one piece canopy, which makes the modified glider (Ka-7/ 13) look very similar to its successor, the Schleicher Ka-13. The lowering of the wings greatly improves the visibility from the rear


Schleicher Ka-8

Specifications

Performance Other The Ka-8 was derived from the Ka-6 series as a simple single-place sailplane with dive brakes using construction techniques similar to the Ka-7, and simplified for amateur construction from kits. Emphasis was on rugged construction, good climbing ability in thermals and good handling characteristics. The orignal Ka-8 had a very small canopy. The Ka-8B, by far the most numerous variant, has a substantially larger canopy while the Ka-8C features a longer nose, larger main wheel located ahead to the center of gravity and deletion of the larger wooden nose skid resulting in a roomier cockpit. Karl Striedeck of the U.S. made a 767.0 km./ 476.6 miles ridge flight in a Ka-8B to win the world out and return in 1968. ATC


Schleicher Ka-9

Specifications

Performance Other

Schleicher Ka-10

Specifications

Performance Other

Schleicher ASW-12

Specifications

Performance Other The ASW-12 is the production development of the trend setting Akaflieg D-36. At one time the ASW-12 held all three world distance records. A fiberglass design featuring camber-changing flaps, the –12 had no dive brakes; early examples lacked the later added (and at first non-jettisonable) tail chute for glidepath control, a feature which tended to make it challenging on approach and landing. One example belongs to the National Soaring Museum. ATC.


Schleicher ASK-13

Specifications

Performance Other The ASK-13 two-place tandem trainer was a development of the earlier Ka-7. The performance improvement was marginal, but the mid-wing design and improved canopy made for much better pilot visibility. The landing wheel is fixed and sprung with rubber cones, and the ship is fitted with airbrakes. In later models, a nosewheel was substituted for the skid. After Schleicher ceased production, the sailplane has been license-built by Jubi GmbH of Oerlinghausen, Germany. ATC


Schleicher ASK-14

Specifications

Performance
 
 
Other The ASK-14, which first flew in 1967, was a low-wing, powered version of the Ka-6E with a 2-cycle, 2-cylinder Hirth engine driving a featering Hoffmann propeller. It features a retractable, single-wheel landing gear and spoilers. ASK-14’s took the second, third and fourth places in the single-place class of the first international motorglider contest at Burg Feuerstein in Germany in 1970.


Schleicher ASW-15

Specifications – ASW-15 (ASW-15B in parenthesis)

Performance Other The ASW-15, which first flew in 1968, was Schleicher’s first composite Standard Class design, originally appearing with a fixed wheel and no water ballast in conformity with the then Standard Class rules. It has an all-moving horizontal tail and metal airbrakes for glidepath control. With the modification of the Standard Class rules to allow water ballast and retractable gear, Schleicher fitted a retracting gear, installed 38 kg./ 83 lb. Tanks in each wing and strengthened keel, lengtened cockpit, larger rudder and increased all-up weight. Data in parenthesis in the specifications column pertain to the B-version. ATC


Schleicher ASW-17

Specifications

Performance Other The ASW-17 was the second of Gerhard Waibel’s Open Class designs, superseding the ASW-12. Aluminum double segment airbrakes make for much easier approach and landing. The four-piece wing, only 4.5 inches deep at the root, has provision for up to 100 kg./ 220 lb. Of water ballast and a four-setting flap/ aileron system in which the ailerons droop with the flaps. An ASW-17 flown by Hans Werner Grosse of Germany gained the World record 1,000 km. Speed triangle at 145.33 kph/ 78.5 kt/ 90 mph and the 1,250 speed triangle at 133.24 kph/ 71.9 kt/ 82.8 mph in 1980, both in an ASW-17. ATC


Schleicher ASK-18

Specifications

Performance Other

Schleicher ASW-19 (RAF Valiant T. Mk. 1)

Specifications

Performance Other The ASW-19 succeeded the ASW-15 as Schleicher’s Standard Class Sailpane using a somewhat thinner airfoil than the model it raplaced. The airbrake operates on the upper wing surface only. Bear Selen of the Netherlands won the Standard Class at the 1978 World Championships flying an ASW-19. The Royal Air Force uses 5 ASW-19’s (known as the Valiant T. Mk.1) in its Air Cadet training program. ATC


Schleicher ASW-20

Specifications

Performance Other The ASW-20 first flew in 1977 and was an instant success, winning numerous world and national championships. Built for the 15 m. racing class, it features trailing edge flaps which interconnect with the ailerons and allow the entire trailing edge to operate as a flap between –9 and +5 degrees. The flaps also act as ailerons, but deflect only half of the aileron amount. The fuselage is similar to that of the ASW-19. Schempp-Hirth type airbrakes are provided on the upper wing surface only and operate in conjunction with the flaps at approach setting. The –20B model was introduced in 1983 incorporating new aerodynamic developments in the form of pneumatic (‘turbulator’) jets (about 860) placed in the lower wing surface, drawing impact air from pitot inlets and exhausting it into the boundary layer to delay underwing flow separation. The B model has its gross weight increased to 525 kg./ 1,157 lb. Other changes include automatic elevator hookup, an instrument cluster attached to the forward-hinged canopy, and a hydraulic disc brake. The –20C model has a slightly modified cockpit, an maximum gross weight of 454 kg./ 1,001 lb and water ballast of 120 kg./ 264 lb. Schleicher also introduced an ‘L’ variant, with span extended to 16.59 m. by use of detachable tip extensions, making the ASW-20L, -20BL and 20CL. In these, water ballast is restricted to 50 kg./ 110 lb. And gross weight is 430 kg./ 948 lb (BL) and 380 kg. / 837 lb and no ballast (CL). With the extended tips, best glide ratio goes up to about 46. The ASW-20 was also license built by Centrair in France in three variants. The ASW-20F and ASW-20FL are the Centrair equivalents to the 20 B and 20BL model while the 20 FP is an F model with NASA winglets designed to improve performance in weak conditions. Roy Mcmaster, Karl Striedeck and John Seymour won jointly, with others, the world triangle distance record of 1,435 km./ 891.6 miles in 1994 in an ASW-20B. ASW-20’s won 2nd and 3rd places in the 15 m. class at the 1983 World Championships at Hobbs, NM. Specifications are for the B model.

 


Schleicher ASK-21 (USAF TG 9; RAF Vanguard T. Mk. 1)

Specifications

Performance Other Schleicher’s entry to the composite two-seat sailplane market, the ASK-21 first flew in 1979 and is approved for a number of aerobatic maneuvers. Schempp-Hirth type airbrakes (upper surface only), ailerons and elevators are operated by pushrods in ball bearing; the rudder is cable-operated. Wings attach with a tongue-and-fork connection and two pins. The fixed main wheel is aft of the center of gravity, with a nosewheel; a tailwheel is available as an option instead of a skid. A flight test evaluation by Dick Johnson demonstrated a best L/D of 31:1 but this could likely be increased by installation of wing root and other seals. The United States Air Force Academy operates 4 ASK-21’s as the TG-9. The Royal Air Force purchased 10 (known as the Vanguard T. Mk. 1) for its Air Cadet training program. ATC


Schleicher ASW-22

Specifications – ASW-22B (ASW-22BE in parenthesis)

Performance Other The Open Class successor to the Schleicher ASW-17, the ASW-22 first flew in 1981 as a 22 m. ship, of which 39 were produced. Span on the ASW-22B model was increased to 25 m. with a modified inner wing section and flaperons similar to the ASW-20. It uses Horstmann and Quast airfoil technology with underwing pitot tubes to collect high-pressure ram air which then ejected through 860 tiny turbulator holes in the bottom wing skin ahead of the flap and aileron hinge line to delay separation of laminar flow on the lower surface and thereby reduce wing drag. Construction of the four-piece wing is primarily of carbon fiber, while the fuselage and horizontal stabilizer are combinations of fiberglass and Kevlar with some carbon. Approach control is achieved using top surface double segment Schempp-Hirth airbrakes and a tail parachute. The ASW-22 is fitted with a two-wheel retractable udercarriage. Measured flight testing of the 25 m. model by Dick Johnson demonstrated a best L/D of 56:1 at 47 kt. An ASW-22 flown by Hans Werner Grosse of Germany gained the world 750 km speed triangle record in 1985 at 158.41 kph/ 85.53 kt/ 98.43 mph. An ASW-22B won 1st and 2nd places in the Open Class at the 1987 World Championships at Benalla, Australa, another came 1st at the 1991 worlds at Uvalde, TX, and at the 1993 Worlds at Borlange Sweden, two came 1st and 2nd. The ASW-22BE is a self-launching version with a mast mounted engine. Water ballast is reduced to 120 kg./ 264 lb. Specifications are for the ASW-22B with the –22BE in parenthesis.

  


Schleicher ASK-23

Specifications

Performance Other The ASK-23 is a composite structure flapless early solo/ club sailplane designed as a successor to the Schleicher Ka-8 and ASK-18. It is the single-place counterpart of the two-place ASK-21 with cockpit layout similar to that of the latter’s front cockpit. It has a fixed gear and Schempp-Hirth type airbrakes.

  


Schleicher ASW-24

Specifications – ASW-24 (ASW-24E in parenthesis)

Performance Other The ASW-24, which first flew in 1987, is the Standard Class successor to the Schleicher ASW-19. Approach control is effected by top surface Schempp-Hirth type airbrakes. Designer Waibel won the 1992 OSTIV Award for significant contributions to safety for the ASW-24 design. The ASW-24E is the self-launching version for which specifications ar given in parenthesis. ATC


Schleicher ASH-25

Specifications

Performance Other The tandem two-place ASH-25 first flew in 1986 and within a couple of years had set five world records for speed over a triangular course varying from 330 km./ 205.1 miles to 1,380 km/ 857.0 miles. Hans Werner Grosse of Germany has in all set 12 world records flying an ASH-25. It is the production version of the one-off two-place ASW-22-2 using an adaption of the fuselage of the Akaflieg Stuttgart FS-31. The sustainer engined ASH-25E is powered by a retractable 19 kW/ 25 bhp Rotax 275 engine. A flight test evaluation by Dick Johnson measured a best L/D of 54.3 : 1 without turbulator tape or special sealing. An ASH-25 flown by G. Herbaud and J-N. Herbaud of France both won the world multiplace straight distance and goal distance records of 1,383 km./ 859.3 miles in the same flight in 1992.


Schleicher ASH-26E

Specifications

Performance Other Designed as a dedicated 18 m. sailplane rather than an extended-tip 15 m. model, flapped self-launching ASH-26E claims better performance from being optimized for this span. The Midwest engine installation is distinctive from most previous mast mounted retractable engines in that the engine remains in the fuselage when the propeller is raised, permitting reduction of the sailplane’s noise footprint.


Schleicher ASW-27

Specifications

Performance Other The 15 m. racing class successor to the ASW-20 has been designed to maximize performance without regard to possible span extension or addition of an engine. Airbrakes are top surface triple element Schempp-Hirth type to compensate for the very thin wing section.


Schleicher ASW-28

Specifications

Performance  
Other Text from: http://www.aerokurier.rotor.com/

New: Schleicher ASW 28

Schleicher in Poppenhausen, Germany, is building a new Standard Class glider with a modern laminar wing profile for "turbulent" conditions.

The preliminary data for the new Standard Class racer: best glide number of 45 at 90 km/h with a wing load of 31 kg/m². By using the most modern materials such as carbonfibre and Aramid along with a new Polyethylene fibre, joining a high strength with low weight, Schleicher tries to achieve an empty weight of only 325 kg, possibly even giving a wing loading of only 30 kg/m². On the other hand, four integrated tanks for a maximum water ballast of 180 liters is supposed to keep the spectrum at a 50 kg/m² wing loading open. Gerhard
Waibel emphasizes the aircraft’s passive and active safety features. The ASW 24 derived fuselage is designed to be fitted with a rescue system, the ASW 28 being delivered from the beginning with such a system.
 

The ASW 24 (along with other Standard Class aircraft coming on the market at that point in time) showed an effect which Gerhard Waibel wanted to avoid in any case with the succeeding model. The ASW 24 does not "like" turbulent air conditions. This effect showed up only over time and by comparison in competitions. The excellent flying characteristics and the very good performance of the ASW 24 in smooth air suffer when the air becomes turbulent in a certain way. The ASW 28 is featuring a new profile from Professor Loek Boermans, selected from 200 other calculated variants, which is supposed to give the new glider a top performance and excellent handling characteristics.

Source: Aerokurier


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