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Aircraft cooperative Mechta AC-4 Russia

Specifications 

Performance

Other

A runner up in the OSTIV world class sailplane design contest, the Russia comes in the raildragger AC-4A model, and the AC-4B with main wheel set behind the center of gravity and a nose wheel. The latter has a slightly more spacious cockpit able to accept taller pilots. The AC-4 is offered with a ballistic emergency recovery parachute. It can be fitted with a 12 bhp / 9 kW McCulloch MC-101B 2 cycle sustainer engine.


Berkshire C-70 Concept

Specifications

Performance

Other

The C-70 which first flew in 1971, is a 15-meter racing class ship of molded fiberglass construction. The fuselage incorporates a tubular-steel framework that ties together the landing gear, wing fittings and a protective cage around the pilot. Differing in a number of respects from the prototype, the production version emerged with a Wortmann airfoil, full-span flaps, no brakes and a conventional horizontal tail. The 90-degree flaps allow a very steep landing approach. The ship also features retractable gear, in-flight adjustable rudder pedals, adjustable seat-back and (optional) 91 kg./ 200 lb. Water ballast. Production ceased in 1974.


 Bolkow Phoebus

Specifications – Phoebus B (Phoebus C in parenthesis)

Performance

Other

The Phoebus was derived from the Phonix, which first flew in 1957, the world’s first successful fiberglass sailplane. The Phoebus came from the same team of designers and used the same fiberglass and balsa wood sandwich technique. The A model (shown), a Standard Class design with fixed gear, first flew in 1964. The B model, an A with retractable gear, appeared in 1967. When FAI rules changed in 1970 the B qualified as a Standard Class ship and the A was discontinued. The C model with retractable gear also emerged in 1967, but with a longer 17 meter wing and a tail drag chute. Specifications for the c are in parenthesis. ATC


Caproni A-21

Specifications

Performance

Other

Caproni ( which built its first glider in 1908 at Vizzola Ticino, Italy ) produced the first A-21 in 1970, and within two years had collected four world multi-place sailplane speed and distance records with it. A 2-place all-metal ship with a fiberglass forward fuselage, the A-21 was followed into production by the slightly improved S model for which the accompanying data is given. The ship features a roomy side-by-side cockpit and widely spaced retractable twin landing wheels. Aft-hinged brakes on the lower surface, and these, with large flaps (which deflect to +89 degrees) limit speed in a vertical five to 188 kph / 102 kt / 117 mph. The T-tail is all moving. A steerable tail wheel and water ballast were optional. The jet powered A-21SJ has self-launch capabillity and a service ceiling of 10.973 m. / 36,000 ft. Specifications in parenthesis refer to the A-21 SJ.

Text from Aerokurier July '97:

Caproni Calif A-21S: Flying for two

The origin of the metal-construction Calif A-21S goes back more than 25 years. Still, the performance two-seater, by far, does not belong to the scrap-heap. As a true alternative for two-seat flying, the Calif is currently being small-series produced (6 aircraft) at the Gomolzig Flugzeug- und Maschinenbau. The Calif really offers a new quality for joint gliding, the pilots sitting side-by-side, shoulder by shoulder.

The Italian construction offers good performance (comparable to Janus C) and good flying characteristics, giving the aircraft a broad range of applications reaching from advanced training and guest flights up to performance flights. Only for competition flights in the double-seater class, it is exceeding the 20-meter definition by a few centimeters. The Calif is a real alternative in the performance two-seater class, giving joint flying a new quality. Also, the aircraft offers an attractive price. The A-21S costs approximately 20000 Marks less than a Duo Discus. The demonstration aircraft is being offered for DM14000, including VAT and with a very good instrumentation (Peschges VP7).

See also http://www.geocities.com/Pipeline/2550/  The official The Official Tapis Volant Home Page


Celair GA-1 Celstar

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Celstar, specifically designed to JAR 22 specifications for competitive aerobatics ( 10 g), first flew in 1989. It has full span mass balanced ailerons. Airbrakes are used for appoach control. The main wheel is retractable.


 

Centrair 101 Pegase A, B & D and Club

Specifications

Performance

Other

Centrair developed the standard class Pegase after manufacturing the 15 m. racing class Schleicher AS-W 20 under license, and the fuselage is similar. The wing is all new, with a profile developed by French airfoil experts. The Pegase has a larger diameter tail boom to resist breakage in groundloops, and considerable modification in the wing-to-fuselage fairing. Three Pegase models were produced, the A with glass fiber and the B with carbon fiber mainspar. The B was superseded by the improved D model. The B and D have a slightly different wing airfoil, and significantly higher gross weight and greater provision for water ballast. The D has a claimed best L/D of 42 at 105 kph/ 57 kt/ 65 mph. All versions can be flown with or without winglets (large onces). The 101 Club is a simplified variant of the Standard Class Pegase designed for club use with a non-retractable main wheel and no provision for water ballast. In the adjoining data, figures in parenthesis are for the Pegase B. Centrair was acquired by Aeronautique Service in 1988.


DWLKK PW-2D

Specifications

Performance

Other

The lightweight open cockpit PW-2D was designed for both factory assembly and as a kit for homebuilding


 Eiri Avion PIK-20

Specifications – PIK 20B (PIK-20E in parenthesis)

Performance

Other

Country of origin Finland

Designer Pekka Tammi

No. of seats 1

No. in the U.S. over 70

The Pik-20 was designed as a 15 m. racing class, all-fiberglass sailplane with water ballast, retractable gear and 90 degrees trailing edge flaps for landing. The B model added flap-aileron interconnection and more water, which could be retrofitted to earlier models. Carbon fiber spars were optional on early B models, but later became standard. Ingo Renner won the 15 m. class at the 1976 World Championships at Rayskala, Finland in a B-model, and others finished 2nd, 3rd and 5th. The Pik-20D added Schemmpp-Hirth air brakes and full-span ‘flaperons’ which operate differentially for roll control and deflect from –12 degrees to +16 degrees for cruise or approach control. The –20D features carbon fiber spar caps and carbon reinforcement strips ar critical locations in the fiberglass monocoque fuselage. On later production models the nose profile was sharpened, the tail moved 5 inches forward and fuselage fairings recontoured to reduce drag. The PIK-20E is a –D sailplane with a retractable Rotax two-cylinder two-cycle engine. A manual crank handle requires about 15 turns to deploy or retract the engine. Specifications are given for the –20D, with the –20E in parenthesis. The –20B and –20D have ATC.


Explorer PG-1 Aque glider

Specifications

Performance

Other

The biplane open cockpit Glider first flew in 1959. It has an all-moving tail with trim, and a fixed gear (water skis). Plans were sold for homebuilt construction, One belongs to the EAA Aviation Foundation, Oskosh, WI.


Flug un Fahrzeugwerke Diamant

Specifications – Diamant 18 ( Diamant 16.5 in parenthesis)

Performance

Other

The development of this early all-fiberglass sailplane began at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich under the direction of Prof. Rauscher, first flying with a new fuselage and tailplane married to wings from a schleicher Ka-6 (the Ka Bi-Vo). Further development was taken over by Flug un Fahrzeugwerke (FFA) which used flapped 15 m. Hutter H-30TS wings, first flying in 1964. After production 13 examples of this model (the HBV Diamant), production shifted to the Diamant 16.5 with a new 16.5 m. wing designed and built by FFA. This was the first all glass fiber production sailplane, not using balsa or other wood sandwiched between the fiberglass layers. The Diamant 18 is an 18 m. development of the 16.5, first flying in 1968, with extended inboard wing and flap sections and a new wingtip cap. At least one Diamant 18 was substantially modified by Dan Pierson of Los Angeles, CA to have a 19.0 m. / 62.3 ft. wing carrying 145 kg / 320 lb. Of water ballast bringing the gross weight up to 673 kg/ 1,480 lb. Specifications are for the Diamant 18 with those for the 16.5 in parenthesis. The HBV Diamant and Diamant 16.5 are ATC, while the Diamant 18 is EXP.
 


 

Fibrera KK-1e UTU

Specifications

Performance

Other

A Standard Class sailplane which first flew in 1964, the Utu has a fixed landing wheel and a trailing-edge split spoiler/terminal-velocity brake. One surface rotates up like a spoiler and the other splits down like a flap and the resultant air deflection from the upper spoiler drives the wing down in a strong negative lift configuration.


Group Genesis Genesis 1 and 2

Specifications – Genesis I

Performance

Other

The Genesis is a Standard Class Sailplane designed to give stability from a positive pitch moment built into the wing, thus avoiding the need for the usual large tailplane required to counteract the negative pitch stability in normal wing configurations. This results in reduced drag from a much smaller fuselage and tailplane giving less wetted area. The prototype Genesis 1 first flew in 1993. The design provides for automatic control hookups, and a ballistic recovery parachute is intended to be fitted as standard. Kits and complete airframes are to be produced by Sportina Aviacija in Lithuania, the builder of the LAK-12. Specifications are for the prototype Genesis 1 as designed : on completion, empty weight was substantially greater. The production version, Genesis 2, is expected to bring empty weight back to close to that predicted for the prototype. Other refinements incorporated as a result of prototype flight testing include a change to the aerodynamic twist to the wing, a modified tip airfoil section and a retractable nose wheel.

Message clipped from the rec.aviation.soaring newsgroup:
Hello Everyone. Here's the news we've been waiting for, direct from the Republic of Lithuania:

On Friday 7 November 1997 three high tow were successfully completed with the first new Genesis 2. Both factory test pilots flew today and were unanimous in their prase of the flying qualities. According to them: Aileron force are very low, roll rate is about 3.5 seconds from a 45 to 45 degree bank at 50 knots (a full second better than the G1 prototype). Coordination is very normal and was excellent during the 45 to 45 roll maneuver. Rudder pressures are light (even with the tip spoilers now connected to the rudder). Pitch forces are light. Tow position is easy to hold on 50 meter tow rope. Dive brakes are very effective. Cockpit visibility is very good. Landing gear retracts easily. Placement of cockpit controls is good. Cockpit visibility is very good.

Flying from our grass field, which is very rough, showed that the spring rate of the nose wheel may need to be increased. Flights will be conducted from a hard surface runway next week to see how it behaves there.

More reports will follow when I return 17 November from my vist to Lithuania. I hope they let me fly.

Regards, Greg Crook


HAIG Minibat

Specifications

Performance

Other

Haig, who developed the American Eagle American Eaglet, designed this kitbuilt ultalight which with tip extensions has a claimed L/D of 30. Conceived with a sustainer engine turning a small propeller in the gap between the rear fuselage and the rudder and built almost entirely out of foam and fiberglass, the Minibat is not a self-launching design but intended, after launch by auto-tow, winch or aerotow, to provide a positive rate of climb with its chainsaw engine. Specifications and performance figures in parenthesis are for the extended tip version.


Hermanspann Chinook S

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Chinook S, which first flew in 1996, is an improved version of the original Chinook of 1993. Approach control is by full deflection trailing edge flaps. Both the flaps and main wheel are hydraulically actuated. The sailplane has been used to study the effect of rain on airfoils, and dynamics at the stall.


Kaspar Bekas 1-A

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Bekas, which first flew in 1968, was a development of an earlier, 1959, design of Kasper, The BKB. The design of the Bekas 1-A had three main aims : a higher L/D (archieved by using a greater span and aspect ratio), easier ground handling and rigging and a flexible wing to study the effect of bending on stability and controllability. It has a fixed gear and trailing-edge control surfaces on the out-board portion of the wing which serve a dual role of elevator and aileron.

  


Lamson Alcor

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Alcor, the first pressurized sailplane, was designed and first flown in 1973 as a research vehicle able to gain high altitudes while keeping the cockpit environment safe and comfortable. This was achieved by pressurizing the cockpit and building the ship light enough so that it could operate successfully in weak mountain wave conditions. The cockpit pressure differtial maintains two to three inches of mercury. The sole Alcor now belongs to the Museum Flight Foundation, Seattle, WA.


Lehtovaara PIK 16 Vasama

Specifications

Performance

Other

First flown 1961, the Vasama was designed to the then Standard rules with fixed gear and top and bottom surface airbrakes. It won the 1963 OSTIC prize at the World Championship at Junin, Argentina, and placed third in its class at the contest.


Luenger Beta 1

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Beta 1 was designed with the intent of being the US’s first fiberglass production sailplane. The semi boom-and-pod fuselage was composed of two fiberglass half-shells that join top and bottom. It featured a fully-reclined pilot position, T-tail with mass-balanced elevators, fixed gear and Schempp-Hirth speed-limiting dive brakes. The Beta 1 has been donated to the National Soaring Museum.


 Marsden Gemini

Specifications

Performance

Other

The side-by-side two-place Gemini, which flew in 1973, has a genuine variable geometry planform. Marsden, who successfully modified the British Operation Sigma Type C variable geometry glider, used a number of the Sigma features in his design. It has full span 35 % chord Fowler flaps which are extended when climbing and retracted when cruising. When extended, a high maximum coefficient of lift of 2.2 is achieved, giving a good climb performance. The flaps also deflects to 80 degree for approach control. It has slotted ailerons for improved roll control. During the 1970’s the Gemini set 7 Canadian multi-place records, 3 of which it still holds, including the 500 km speed triangle.


 Masak Scimitar I

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Scimitar is a 15 m. racing class sailplane which matches an advanced Discus planform wing with electronic boundary layer control married to a Schempp-Hirth Ventus fuselage. The Scimitar II is a Standard Class sailplane developed form the Scimitar I.


 MDM-1 Fox

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Fox, which first flew in 1993, is a development of the single-place aerobatic Swift S 1. Although it has been described as two-place for all jobs, the Fox is optimized for aerobatic traing with erect and inverted clearance of +9/-6 g with one person and +7/-5 g with two people. The landing gear is fixed, and approach control is assisted by Schempp-Hirth airbrakes.


Melsheimer FM-1

Specifications

Performance

Other

First flown in 1968, the FM-1 featured seating and a steel tube and fiberglass front fuselage.


Miller Tern

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Tern is a wood and fiberglass sailplane designed for homebuilding. The ship features a fixed wheel, airbrakes and an optional parachute installation in the tail. A 55 ft./ 16.76 m. span Tern II, first flown in 1968, raised the Tern’s best L/D ratio and accounted for several of the total completed. One Tern belongs to the National Soaring Museum.


 Monaghan Osprey

Specifications

Other

The Osprey, a Standard Class sailplane which made its first flight in 1973, features a retractable gear, 90 degree flaps and a T-tail.


 Monnett Monerai

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Monerai was designed as a pure sailplane or with either of two power pods for self-launching capabillity, the Zenoah and the KFM 107. In addition, the Monerai Max wingtip extension kit was conceived to add more than three feet to the span, bringing it to 12 meters, and raising the L/D to more than 30:1. It uses flaps, which can be lowered to 90 degree, for approach control.


Neukom Standard Elfe S-3

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Elfe series started from a 9 m sailplane designed by W.Pfenninger before World War II. A new design was introduced by him in 1947 to become the Elfe 2, probably the first sailplane with a laminar flow airfoil. Subsequently the series was further developed by Markwalder to become the Elfe PM-3 (brought to the US in the sixties), then by Albert Neukom the Elfe M, Elfe MN and AN66 before the Standard Elfe S-1 appeared in 1964 with a V-tail, followed by the S-2 with convetional tail. The S-3, the production model of the S-2, first flew in 1966 with a tailplane fixed part of the way up the fin. It has trailing edge airbrakes and a rubber-sprung retractable main wheel. A Standard Elfe came second in the 1965 World Championships at South Cerney, England flown by Markus Ritzi of Switzerland. A.J. Smith of the U.S. took first place in the Standard Class at the 1968 World Championships at Leszno, Poland in an S-3Neukom Standard Elfe S-3
 
 


Peterson J-4 Javelin

Specifications

Performance

Other

The J-4 Javelin, a single ship capable of carrying a child behind the pilot features an aileronless wing with spoilers for glidepath control and ‘spoilerons’ for roll control, the latter causing almost no adverse yaw. The wing spar is a chem-milled tube, and the airplane uses very few normal rivets, most fastenings being cost saving pop rivets. The fuselage is built around a steel tube frame, with a lower fiberglass shell bonded to aluminum sheet wrapped over the deck. The Javelin first flew in 1969. ATC.


Pilatus B-4 PC-11AF

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Pilatus B-4 originated and was produced in large numbers in Switzerland, first flying in 1972, and was subsequently licensed and manufactured in Japan by Nippi. It is an all-metal design to Standard Class specifications with some foam ribs in the tail assembly. It has full aerobatic capability including inverted maneuvers. Top and bottom surface air brakes are provided for glidepath control. ATC


Posnansky PF-1 White Knight

Specifications

Performance

Other

The White Knight was designed in 1963 while Posnansky was a student in Switzerland, but later has been substantially modified. It has a faired fixed landing gear and speed limiting dive brakes on both upper and lower surfaces, a center of gravity tow hook and a side-mounted control stick. The ship’s similarity in looks to the Swiss FFA Diamant is evident: it was designed during the same period when the predecessor to the Diamant was under development in Switzerland, and while that aircraft first flew with Schleicher Ka-6 wings, the White Knight used Schleicher Ka-8 wings.


Roberts Cygnet

Specifications

Other

The Cygnet, which first flew in 1992, was the only U.S. entrant in the IGC/ OSTIC World Class sailplane design contest (won by the Polish designed PW-5). It has balanced DFS type airbrakes for approach control, and is fitted with a ballistic parachute emergency recovery system.


 Schmutzhart SCH-1

Specifications

Performance

Other

Schmutzhart’s SCH-1 homebuilt was designed to be small enough to be built in his Washingtion D.C. townhouse. The fuselage was made by bending the outside skin into a wooden jig and riveting the bulkheads and stringers to it from the inside, working through the open top which was then covered. The main wing spar center section was milled from a solid I-beam of 6061 T6 aluminum. The outer spars are of bent flat stock and angled extrusions. Ribs ahead of the spar were bandsawed from dense Styrofoam : aft of the spar they are of sheet aluminum hammered over formblocks. The T-tail was originally all moving, but later modified to have a convetional stabilizer. Approach control is by means of flaps, the setting of which are 0, +4, +45 and +70 degrees.


Sportina Aviacija LAK 12 Lietuva

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Open Class LAK 12 first flew in 1979. Approach control is by a combination of top surface double panel Schempp-Hirth type airbrakes and landing flaps. The performance and landing flaps operate through a range of –7/ +15 degrees, and the ailerons droop with the flaps. The retractable main wheel has a shock absorbing air-oil oleo strut.


Start + Flug H101 Salto

Specifications – aerobatic category (normal in parenthesis)

Performance

Other

The Salto is an aerobatic sailplane designed by Ursula Hanle, widow of the former Glasflugel director and designer Eugen Hanle. The Salto, which first flew in 1971, employs a Standard Libelle wing shortened at the root to produce a span of 13.6 m., and fitted with trailing edge dive brakes and a tail parachute for approach control. The fuselage has a fixed, faired wheel and a V-tail. Many other features of the Libelle are incorporated. Tip extensions have been designated extending the wingpsan up to a much as 15.8 m./ 51.8 ft. form ‘g’ limitations are +7 and –5. Later production was by Dokter Fiberglas. ATC


Swift S-1

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Swift, which first flew in 1991, was designed as a sailplane for contest aerobatics (about 10 g). It has optional wingtip extensions which increase the span to 15.0 m./ 49.2 ft. The main wheel is retractable. Approach control is by top surface Schempp-Hirth type airbrakes.

  


US Aviation Super floater

Specifications

Performance

Other

An ultalight sailplane, the Super Floater is designed to accommodate a ballistic recovery emergency parachute and comply with U.S. FAA part 103 rules. It has full span ailerons which, as an option, can be configured as flaperons.

  


Wiederkehr GHW-1 Cu-climber

Specifications

Performance

Other

The Cu-Climber first flew in 1968. The wing has a large (12 x 6 in/ 30 x 15 cm) spruce/ plywood/ fiberglass box-spar stressed to +9/ -6.3 g. The remainder of the wing is a fiberglass/ balsa sandwich, with the bottom of the wing aft of the spar covered with fabric. The fuselage is a fiberglass semi-monocoque structure with foam bulkheads. The ship also has an all-moving conventional horizontal tail with an anti-servo tab. Full span ailerons/ flaps are used for approach control.

  


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